Leadership & World Benevolence

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Leadership & World Benevolence

 

Basically, benevolence means a concern for the well-being of persons other than oneself.  Benevolent leadership is

defined as the process of creating a virtuous cycle of encouraging, initiating, and implementing positive change in

organizations through: a) ethical decision making and moral actions, b) developing spiritual awareness and

creating a sense of meaning, c) inspiring hope and fostering courage for positive action, and d) leaving a

legacy and positive impact on the larger community.

 

Benevolent leaders are those who create observable benefits, actions, or results for the common good. Benevolent

leaders are those who create observable benefits, actions, or results for the common good. The term―common good

is used in the sense of shared benefits or positive outcomes for all or most members of a community.

 

 

Leadership & World Benevolence

 

Benevolent leaders exemplify wholehearted and genuine actions at work that benefit people around them. Therefore,

they have an inclination to do good, to do kind or charitable acts due to a felt obligation to use their developmental

and intentional attributes of love and charity.

 

As organizations in private, non-profit, and public sectors are attempting to address ethical, spiritual,

transformational, and social challenges; benevolent leadership model can provide leaders with a fresh perspective on

addressing and solving these challenges. Second, benevolent leadership model underlines the importance of specific

dimensions of corporate environments – a shared mission, a shared sense of purpose, high-quality connections, and

a positive organizational culture – that support creating positive change in organizations.

 

Organizations can provide leadership development programs and training that fosters a benevolent leadership

perspective and disseminates―best practices of benevolent leaders who have succeeded in creating positive

change.

 

 

 

Leadership & World Benevolence

 

The concept of benevolent leadership is distinct from other leadership concepts because of its central emphasis on

creating observable benefits, actions, or results for the common good. The common good is also defined as the

overall conditions, outcomes, or advantages in social-life that are beneficial for the whole community.

 

Benevolent leadership can be defined as the process of creating a virtuous cycle of encouraging, initiating, and

implementing positive change in organizations through: a) ethical decision making and moral actions, b) developing

spiritual awareness and creating a sense of meaning, c) inspiring hope and fostering courage for positive action, and

d) leaving a legacy and positive impact on the larger community.

 

 

http://www.benevolentcapitalism.com/

 

Leadership & World Benevolence

 

The crisis of confidence in leadership in organizations has become a matter of intense concern in the corporate

world.  First, benevolent leadership implies that leaders should consider and balance all four perspectives in their

decisions and actions: ethical, spiritual, transformational, and social.

 

The multidimensional requirements and concerns for the common good in organizations present particular difficulties

for leaders. The new challenges call for a new level of courageous, principled, and integrative leadership which

balances ethical, spiritual, transformational, and social concerns at the same time.

The vitality and utility of benevolent leadership model is based on the insight and integrative picture the model

provides leaders in their decisions and actions at work. Without such integration on a substantial level of nuanced

thinking and balanced action, leaders may be confronted with the threats of facing analysis paralysis and making

partial decisions.

 

Therefore, benevolent leadership model explicitly recognizes and underlines the importance of a leader‘s ―heart-

sets as critical as the leader‘s mindsets in the workplace. In the context of the global economic crisis; ethical

sensitivity, spiritual depth, positive engagement, and community responsiveness represent the critical heart-sets of

leaders who want to leave a positive legacy behind them.

 

The usage of these four critical heart-sets of benevolent leadership will be a critical success factor in leading positive

change and creating common good in organizations in the 21st century.

 

For more information on “Benevolent Leadership” go to and take a look at the Doctoral thesis of Fahri Karakas. – https://www.researchgate.net/publication/41662926_Benevolent_leadership?enrichId=rgreq-ae500e94500c0d9022b72c44748fa97d-XX&enrichSource=Y292ZXJQYWdlOzQxNjYyOTI2O0FTOjEwMzk0Njk4MzA1MTI3OUAxNDAxNzk0MzAxMDEw&el=1_x_2&_esc=publicationCoverPdf

 

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Follow Dale K. Greene:

Originator & Chief Organizer of The United Societies.

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